Day 2: Delhi

One cannot rediscover the splendor of Ancient India without cruising through the National Museum of Delhi. Sad to say, all the Mohenjo-Daro and Harappa galleries were closed for renovation.

To my joyous surprise, the cutest paintings of Lord Krishna were displayed in the Medieval Gallery, so all wasn’t lost. Hari Om!

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Surrender

When will I surrender,

not as a villain,

but as a pious man?

When will I give in,

not to avoid stress,

but to contribute?

When will I bow down,

not to exercise weakness,

but to express humility?

When will I let go, 

not to forget the past,

but to seize the moment?

When . . .

( Poem by Quiet Riley / Artwork by Ai Jing )

Last Day in India, Part 2 (Kolkata)

To conclude, traveling through India isn’t only about samosas, chai tea and the Taj Mahal, it’s about self-discovery and cultivation, seeking a higher-consciousness and expanding your boundaries, both socially and spiritually. So if you’re interested in those things (plus much, much more*), I recommend that you go. I’ll be there, following my dharma, doing asanas and, of course, sharing a cup of chai with a new friend.

 

* find out for yourself 😉

Varanasi Art and Kama Sutra

Night or day, Varanasi is a succulent feast for the eyes. Covering the ancient walls and floors are paintings of every taste imaginable. And for the sweet-toothed are tantalizing sculptures of various kama sutra positions; but be warned—these displays are not for the faint-hearted.

New Delhi to Varanasi

The Manduadih Express from Delhi takes 15 hours to reach Varanasi, but leftover samosas, chai tea and great company make the trip worthwhile. Plus, being welcomed by spiritual murals is a nice way to jumpstart your pilgrimage (even if your soul doesn’t agree with the hard and lumpy bunk bed).

Final Night in Jaipur

During my last evening in Jaipur, I visit the oldest museum in Rajasthan, the Albert Hall Museum. Inside, I admire the exquisite decor and myriad of paintings, sculptures and textiles from India and other regions of the world (including ancient Egypt).

Afterwards, I enjoy a traditional Rajasthani dinner and head back to my treehouse hotel, Jaipur Inn. Overall, my stay in Jaipur is bittersweet: although I’ve learned so much, met so many amazing people and seen things forever ingrained in memory, two days had not been enough. I could have done so much more with more time. In other words, if you are planning a trip to the Golden Triangle, do yourself a favor and stay at least 4-5 days in Jaipur.