Final Night in Jaipur

During my last evening in Jaipur, I visit the oldest museum in Rajasthan, the Albert Hall Museum. Inside, I admire the exquisite decor and myriad of paintings, sculptures and textiles from India and other regions of the world (including ancient Egypt).

Afterwards, I enjoy a traditional Rajasthani dinner and head back to my treehouse hotel, Jaipur Inn. Overall, my stay in Jaipur is bittersweet: although I’ve learned so much, met so many amazing people and seen things forever ingrained in memory, two days had not been enough. I could have done so much more with more time. In other words, if you are planning a trip to the Golden Triangle, do yourself a favor and stay at least 4-5 days in Jaipur.


Forts, Cattle and Rustic Views

Because Jaipur is vast and eclectic in so many ways, this post will be separated into different categories. The first is Hawa Mahal. Built in 1799, this “royal honeycomb” was used mainly by princesses and aristocratic women to view street parades via one of its 953 windows.

This category is called Meandering with a View. At the bottom of the Aravalli Hills, I tell Suresh to drop me off so that I may walk to Nahargarh Fort. “Are you crazy?” he says, “It’s 6km uphill!” Following a flock of blue peacocks, I disregard his warning and immerse myself in the sights and sounds of nature.

In my opinion, Nahargarh Fort has the best panoramic views of Jaipur. In addition, there is a cool sculpture gallery and plenty of monkeys to keep your camera clicking.

This last category contains modern sculptures constructed by local artists. My favorite is the blue-faced beauty, Migrant, by Ravinder Reddy. Located in elegantly-decorated rooms, there are 25-30 unique sculptures in all.

Relics of India


Different museums throughout Delhi offer different things. The Museum at Red Fort chronicles the British occupation of India. The Gandhi Museum narrates the story of a global (yet humble) hero. And the National Museum exhibits relics from ancient civilizations like Mohenjo Daro and Harappa. But my favorite is the Tactile Museum for the Blind which not only allows visitors to read descriptions in Braille, but allows them to touch the ancient statues and artifacts with their very own hands, helping them form a better understanding of India’s rich and beautiful history.


A Surreal Experience

Here are the remaining photos taken @ The Salvador Dali/ Pablo Picasso Exhibit in Shenzhen, China. To view part one, click here.


Dali/Picasso Exhibit, Part 1

This weekend I stopped by the Salvador Dali & Pablo Picasso exhibit in Shenzhen, China. Being a Dali enthusiast, I spent five surreal hours getting lost in his work (with two much-needed breaks in between). The exhibit was truly immersive, not only showcasing mind-bending prints, portraits and sculptures, but including large-scale replicas of psychedelic sofas and melting clocks for one’s selfie pursuits. Since the collection was quite large, this post will be split into two parts. Enjoy!


Destination: Aesthetic Bliss

For the most part, international airports are associated with duty-free shopping and passengers rushing to their boarding gates. But sometimes, they can be associated with cultural identity and awe-inspiring beauty. Take this airport in Mumbai, India, decorated with historical relics and intricate mandalas. One stroll around its enchanting terminal could make you miss your flight.


Lost in a Cave’s Beauty…

Recently I traveled along what was once the Silk Road. Of course what remains doesn’t reflect the grandeur of ancient times, but with a little help from Google, a compass and friendly locals, I was able to locate a few gems (big ones!). Traveling from east to west, they are Maijishan, Mati Temple and the Mogao Grottoes.

Maijishan @ Tianshui, China

Mati Temple @ Zhangye, China

Mogao Grottoes @ Dunhuang, China