Day 1: Chengdu, China

After years of meandering on mind and foot, I have come to the realization that ancient civilizations around the world have shared ideas. How was this done (via ships, aircraft, portals, inter-dimensional contact, dreams, collective unconscious… ) is what the discussion should really be about. The parallels of Angkor and Mayan architecture. The talk of an ancient flood. Trees of Life. Mummification. Jade’s connection with the afterlife. The proof flows longer than the Nile.

This is what brought my latest meanderings to Chengdu, China, where the ancient Shu lived over 3,000 years ago. Very different from the Shang Dynasty (who lived 700 miles northeast at the time), the Shu took a shamanistic approach to life, connecting with spiritual realms through elaborate ceremony and sacrifice and building monuments very similar to those found in Central and South America (but how?).

Today’s blog include Shu artifacts from the Jinsha Museum. Enjoy!

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Day 11: Goodbye, India

mooo

While exploring the ruins of Maharishi’s ashram, I came across many trippy murals which made me wonder what folks were on back in the day.

Who knows? Maybe they were simply high on Transcendental Meditation.

lotus guru

Before leaving the ashram, I thanked all the creative souls for sharing their visions of beauty, bliss and the great beyond…

…and contributed a few words for the future.

Hari Om

Day 10: Maharishi Ashram

Maharishi and Co.On a rainy afternoon in Rishikesh, I had a chance to visit Indian Guru Maharishi’s ashram. A spiritual retreat in the 1960s for creative minds like the Beatles, the former ashram is now retreating into the earth.

Walking alongside cobblestone memories of an era too radical to fathom, I heard occasional gusts of wind sing, “let it be, let it be, let it be, oh let it be, there will be an answer, let it be.”

And so I rolled a fat one and did just that.

Me too!

Day 9: Rishikesh

Dinner Blessing

The blessing above is posted inside Anand Prakash’s dining room in Rishikesh, where authentic Indian food is served three times per day. From sambar to kofta to tikka masala, this ashram prepares the best sattvic meals that’ll keep one’s mouth watering throughout yoga class.

Day 7: Mathura

Not much to do in Mathura but shop and temple hop, so I was thrilled to find ancient sculptures at the Government Museum. Throughout its long history, Mathura has seen Buddhist, Jain, Hindu and Vedic spirituality flourish. Many art schools taught students how to build large, ornate works that represented their beliefs. Here are some stunning examples!

Day 6: Vrindavan

 

Shakti Maa

Meandering through Vrindavan is a frenetic thing (which is great for those with adventurous hearts). From dawn to dusk, the city is filled with nonstop energy! People worshipping deities, drinking chai, haggling with merchants, chanting mantras, dodging monkeys and cows, driving to who knows where in cars, bikes and rickety rickshaws. Everyday something new and exciting happens. That’s Vrindavan’s charm (and curse if you step in something mushy).

One of my favorite things to do was walk alongside Yamuna as the sun set and lanterns sailed across her violet waters, hearing the soothing chime of temple bells as swamis commence their nightly puja.